Risk Assessment and Cognitive vs. Confirmation Bias

Norman Marks is a major blogger on risk management topics and he recently wrote a post on the pitfalls of bias when assessing a topic having to do with risk assessment. Here's how the two terms of cognitive and confirmation bias are defined:
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A cognitive bias is a mistake in reasoning, evaluating, remembering, or other cognitive process, often occurring as a result of holding onto one’s preferences and beliefs regardless of contrary information. Psychologists study cognitive biases as they relate to memory, reasoning, and decision-making. Many kinds of cognitive biases exist. For example, a confirmation bias is the tendency to seek only information that matches what one already believes. Memory biases influence what and how easily one remembers. For example, people are more likely to recall events they find humorous and better remember information they produce themselves. People are also more likely to regard as accurate memories associated with significant events or emotions (such as the memory of what one was doing when a catastrophe occurred). (See http://www.chegg.com/homework-help/definitions/cognitive-bias-13)
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Confirmation bias, the tendency to process information by looking for, or interpreting, information that is consistent with one’s existing beliefs. This biased approach to decision making is largely unintentional and often results in ignoring inconsistent information. Existing beliefs can include one’s expectations in a given situation and predictions about a particular outcome. People are especially likely to process information to support their own beliefs when the issue is highly important or self-relevant. (https://www.britannica.com/science/confirmation-bias)

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